Path Home Shows 2007 Show Archive June 2007 Show 0722 Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Middle Boggy

Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Middle Boggy

Oklahoma students get a glimpse into the life of Civil War-era Oklahoma as re-enactors recreate the Battle of Middle Boggy Creek.
Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Middle Boggy

Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Middle Boggy

For more information visit these links:

Civil War Traveler

Oklahoma Historical Society

Middle Boggy Depot

Show Details

Show 0722: Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Middle Boggy
Air Date: June 3, 2007

 

Transcript

Rob McClendon: Well, some Oklahoma students got a firsthand glimpse into the life of Civil War-era Oklahoma. Each year, Civil War re-enactors recreate the Battle of Middle Boggy Creek in the area it was fought 143 years ago. As our Lacie Stockstill shows us, this year’s re-enactment focused on the battle and the lives of the men who fought it.

Lacie: it’s a glimpse into our history. Re-enactors coming together in a farm field outside of Atoka recreating the Battle of Middle Boggy. Whit Edwards is the director of special projects for the Oklahoma Historical Society and coordinates the re-enactment that takes place every three years.

Whit Edwards: Today is about teaching students in Oklahoma about their backyard history, basically, and regarding the Civil War.

Lacie: An age-old practice, with a new-spun twist.

Edwards: The idea of entertaining through history. And that entertainment, what we call living history, is a way to teach through entertainment.

Lacie: The sights, sounds and smells of the day coupled with hands-on demonstrations, giving students a taste of what it was like to be a soldier in Civil War America.

Edwards: They learn a little bit about the culture at that time period. They learn a little bit about the troops that were here. For example, we teach them the difference between infantry, artillery and cavalry, the three main branches. We teach them a little bit about what was available for medicine and treatment of injuries. We teach them about the culture, such as the games that they played, the music that they listened to. And, of course, the jobs too, for both men and women, that were available.

Lacie: So what do the students think about this living history?

Bradley Robinson: I think it’s a real good way to learn history because you get to learn firsthand. And it’s really interesting the way that the people lived and the way they did their daily jobs.

Lacie: Recreating a time from our history when countrymen fought countrymen, though painful, offers lessons from which we can still learn.